Norma B. Coe

News

  • We are excited to share that the National Institute on Aging has funded a brand-new undergraduate research training program, GEAR UP.  This joint venture between the Population Aging Research Center (PARC) and the Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics (Penn LDI) will build on the successful and long-standing Summer Undergraduate Minority Research (SUMR) Program, by providing exciting mentored research experiences to undergraduates for two consecutive summers, supplemented with programming throughout the academic year. The long-term goal of the program is to enhance the diversity of the research workforce in the demography and economics of aging, health, and healthcare. Learn more on the GEAR-UP Program page.

  • Norma B. Coe (PSC/PARC Research Associate) and Rachel Werner (PARC Research Associate) authored an LDI blog post entitled, "Family and Friends are the Invisible Workforce in Long-term Care," about their new research published in Health Affairs. These findings help to explain the stories of staffing shortages and burnout in nursing homes under COVID despite no apparent drop in staff hours, when visitor bans were one of the first policy responses to the outbreak. The bans essentially eliminated this invisible workforce, increasing the care demands on the staff, on top of the extra work of the COVID protocols and infections themselves.

  • New study published by Norma B. Coe (PSC/PARC Research Associate) and Rachel M. Werner in JAMA Network Open titled "Trends in Receipt of Help at Home After Hospital Discharge Among Older Adults in the US" was cited in a Penn LDI Blog post on the importance of needing expert help at home for older adults after their discharge from the hospital. 

Co-Director, Population Aging Research Center
Director, PEDAL Lab
Associate Professor, Medical Ethics & Health Policy, Perelman School of Medicine

Ph.D., Economics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2005

I am an Associate Professor in the Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER). I obtained my PhD from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 2005 and have specialized in health economics and the economics of aging. My previous work has been funded by the NIH, the Social Security Administration, John A. Hartford Foundation, and the Marie Curie Incoming International Fellowship from the European Union. I am currently PI of three R01s on aging and dementia, and have previously served as a Director of a research center at the University of Washington and the Associate Director of Research for the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College.

I have made substantial contributions to the literature on the economics of aging. I have previously studied healthcare costs, costs to caregivers, the quality of care delivered in an informal vs. formal care setting, the cost-effectiveness of various interventions, and worked with forecasting models. My recent work has specialized in patients with Alzheimer’s and Related Dementias. I have extensive experience using Medicare claims data, survey data, administrative data and industry data. I find the addition of the two new themes, Cognition, Alzheimer’s disease, and Related Dementias (ADRD) and Health Care and Long-Term Care at Older Ages to the Population Aging Research Center (PARC) especially exciting and I look forward to applying my skillset to these new themes.

The renewal application for the Population Aging Research Center (PARC) builds naturally on my previous research and leadership experience. This work will dovetail nicely with my work as Co-Director of the Analytic Core within the Penn Resource Center for Minority Aging Research (RCMAR): the Center for Improving Care Delivery for the Aging (CICADA). I look forward to providing new leadership and vision to the PARC, through both the Co-PI and as the Director of Core D, to include population-based research on the economics and demography of aging in health care, long-term care, social care, and Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias. The vision for PARC is that it will bridge across many Schools at Penn, including Medicine, Nursing, Wharton, Leonard Davis Institute, and Arts and Sciences. I am skilled at navigating these relationships, as my existing collaborations and teaching responsibilities already span these entities.

I look forward to leveraging the best of Penn to promote existing researchers, new researchers, and new collaborations that forward the science and our understanding of the demographics and economics of population aging.