Jere R. Behrman's Pilot Awards

  • Alzheimer's Disease and Related Dementias (ADRD) in a Developing Country: Expanding the Sample to Give More Power for Collecting and Validating Harmonized Cognitive Assessment Protocol (HCAP) and Examining Its Precursors and Correlates

    Aims: 

    The proposed project will help establish foundations for investigating important questions on Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementia (ADRD) in Chile, a context different from the current Health and Retirement Study (HRS) International Sister Studies. The proposed project will supplement data being collected under an existing PARC Administrative Supplement (AS) for investigating ADRD in Chile. The proposed project will add 250 additional respondents to this data collection. The Centro de Encuestas y Estudios Longitudinales (CEEL) de Universidad Catolica de Chile has funds to cover another 700 and we are also seeking additional funds from multiple sources to reach a sample size of 2,523 (all those in SPS-60+, see below). The data will be collected from a subsample of the Chilean Social Protection Survey (SPS), which is a stratified random national longitudinal sample of ~20,000 adults 18+ years old originating in 2002, with six follow-ups. Moreover, the Chilean government is committed to further rounds of longitudinal data collection, the next being the 2019 SPS. In 2017-2018, the government funded an additional survey of 2,523 SPS respondents aged 60+ (SPS-60+). This survey obtained information on mental and physical health, including reported diagnoses of ADRD, other diseases associated with aging and the Mini-Mental examination as well as sociodemographic information. These data can be linked to previous SPS data rounds to permit rich characterization of life-cycle paths over ~15 years prior to the SPS-60+, and thus of precursors and predictors of mental and physical health reported in the SPS-60+. PARC’s Latin American Network on Aging (LANA) has collaborated for over 15 years with CEEL (Director: Bravo) on the SPS. The SPS originated under the leadership of Bravo and facilitated by PARC Associates Behrman (LANA Head), Mitchell (co-PI on HRS), Soldo (then PI for PARC and MHAS), and Todd (PI on NIA Award to help develop and analyze earlier rounds of the SPS). In 2018, Elo (PI), Behrman and Bravo competed successfully for a P30 Administrative Supplement with the following specific aims: SA1) To expand data from stratified random samples of the SPS-60+ for investigating ADRD in the SPS-60+ by applying the Harmonized Cognitive Assessment Protocol (HCAP); SA2) To validate HCAP with clinical assessments; and SA3) To link the SPS-60+.data to the previous SPS rounds, and examine the precursors and correlates of ADRD diagnosis, Mini-Mental test performance, HCAP, and extent of validation of HCAP, as well as associations among these various measures. The proposed project is low-cost and has high-scientific value for future comparative harmonized studies with HRS International Sister Studies for the unique Chilean population. Next steps include developing a further AS to PARC to link the SPS with the harmonized HRS family of projects in the Gateway to Global Aging Data and to develop a NIA application for in-depth analysis of the SPS and HCAP.

    Abstract: 

    The project will expand data to be collected under an existing PARC Administrative Supplement (AS) for investigating Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementia (ADRD) in a context different from current HRS International Sister Studies. The PARC AS will cover adding the Harmonized Cognitive Assessment Protocol (HCAP) for 1000 respondents to the ongoing Chilean Social Protection Survey (SPS). The Quartet project will cover 250 additional respondents. The SPS is a stratified random national longitudinal sample of ~20,000 adults 18+ years old originating in 2002, with six follow-ups. Because of increasing interest in mental and physical health and impacts of pensions on the well-being of the rapidly-aging Chilean population, the government funded an additional survey of 2,523 SPS sample members 60+ years (SPS-60+) in 2017-8. This survey obtained broad information on mental and physical health and other sociodemographic variables, including reported diagnoses of ADRD and other diseases associated with aging and Mini-Mental test performance. These data can be linked to previous SPS data rounds to permit rich characterization of life-cycle paths over ~15 years prior to the SPS-60+, and thus of precursors and predictors of mental and physical health reported in the SPS-60+. The government is committed to further longitudinal data collection, next the 2019 SPS. Our goal is to obtain funding to cover the 2,523 SPS-60+ sample members. The Centro de Encuestas y Estudios Longitudinales (CEEL) de Universidad Catolica de Chile has funds to cover another 700 and we are seeking additional funds from multiple sources to cover the rest. This overall project and reaching the full sample size has multiple benefits. First, it will expand the PARC Latin American Network on Aging (LANA) by developing an ADRD-focus through building on long LANA relations with CEEL and ~17 years of longitudinal data. Second, the larger sample will allow for more detailed analyses of the determinants of cognition and comparison with the Mexican Health and Aging Study (MHAS) and other surveys using the HCAP. Third, a successful implementation of the HCAP will help facilitate the integration of the SPS to the Gateway to Global Aging Data (GGAD), which is a public resource designed to facilitate cross-national and longitudinal studies on aging using HRS-like studies around the world. The overall combined project has three specific aims: (SA1) To expand data from the SPS-60+ for investigating ADRD by applying HCAP; (SA2) To validate HCAP by comparison with clinical assessments; and (SA3) To link the SPS-60+.data to the SPS rounds, and examine the precursors and correlates of ADRD diagnosis, Mini-Mental test performance, and HCAP, as well as associations among these measures. This project is a low-cost, highscientific value for future comparative harmonized studies with HRS International Sister Studies for the unique Chilean population. Next steps will include developing a further AS to PARC to link the SPS with the harmonized HRS family of projects in the GGDA and to develop a NIA application for in-depth analysis of the SPS and HCAP.

    Funded By: 
    Boettner
    Award Dates: 
    August 1, 2019 - June 30, 2020
  • Silver Spoons, Falling Apples, Grandparental Effects and from Rags to Riches to Rags

    Aims: 

    In this proposed pilot project, we aim to demonstrate that in the presence of intergenerationally-correlated endowments, the many studies that purport to estimate the effects of parental and grandparental characteristics on child outcomes are misinterpreted in ways that are likely to overstate substantially direct parental effects and indirect grandparental effects, and maybe even have the sign wrong for direct grandparental effects. By “intergenerationally-correlated endowments” we mean important factors that affect the outcomes of interest that are usually not observed in social science data, and that are transmitted from one generation to the next, such as family culture or genes. The basic purposes of this pilot project are to develop this point, summarize and reinterpret three-generational studies in the literature in light of this point, develop a model that will permit identification of grandparental effects with data on four generations, locate data across four generations, and then prepare a National Institute of Health (NIH) grant application to explore and reinterpret intergenerational relations in depth to understand better their causal nature.

    Abstract: 

    In recent years, social scientists have increasingly become interested in the effects of grandparents on grandchildren’s demographic, educational and occupational outcomes, leading to the burgeoning literature on multigenerational effects. The growing interest in multigenerational effects reflects the aging trend and growing economic inequality under which grandparents’ roles for grandchildren’s demographic, educational, and economic outcomes may be increasingly relevant. In the proposed pilot project, we will summarize and critically reinterpret three-generational studies in the literature to demonstrate that in the presence of intergenerationally-correlated endowments, the many studies that purport to estimate the effects of parental and grandparental characteristics on child outcomes are misinterpreted in ways that are likely to overstate substantially direct parental effects and indirect grandparental effects, and maybe even have the sign wrong for direct grandparental effects. By “intergenerationally-correlated endowments” we mean important factors that affect the outcomes of interest that are usually not observed in social science data, and that are transmitted from one generation to the next, such as family culture or genes. To evaluate existing studies, we will apply the model of intergenerational relations with consideration of endowments, extending earlier work of Behrman. Based on our evaluation of the literature, we will develop a model that will permit identification of grandparental effects with data on four generations, locate data across four generations, explore and reinterpret intergenerational relations in depth to understand better their causal nature, and prepare an NIH application to undertake this research.

    Funded By: 
    Boettner
    Award Dates: 
    July 1, 2015 - June 30, 2016
  • Early Life to MAture Adulthood: Guatemalan INCAP Health and Socioeconomic Data

    Funded By: 
    P30 Pilots
    Award Dates: 
    September 15, 2014 - June 30, 2015
  • Resource Flows Among Three Generations in Guatemala: Supplementary Analysis and Data Collection

    Aims: 

    To examine interactions among three generations in Guatemala using unusually rich longitudinal data over 35 years that will increase the research productivity of an existing project through added data collection that is not already funded by the existing project.

    Abstract: 

    Rising life expectancy and falling fertility rates are leading to marked increases in the proportion of elderly persons worldwide. This phenomenon has received relatively little attention in many developing countries despite the fact that the proportion of the elderly in developing countries is predicted to treble by 2050. This increase coincides with slow progress in many developing countries in addressing poor levels of nutrition, schooling and health amongst young people. We are undertaking an “intergenerational” study to advance understanding of the roles played by public policy, private resources, preferences, exogenous shocks and markets – and the interactions amongst these factors – in the allocation of resources, and the consequences for well-being of these allocations, across three generations in Guatemala. A unique feature of the study is that it builds upon more than 35 years of data collection that is rich in information about home environment, growth, cognitive development, diet and morbidity. We will have data on the allocation of resources across three generations: G1 (elderly parents), G2 (their children, most of whom are now “middle-generation” parents) and G3 (grandchildren of G1). This is the first study to link prospectively collected data on investments in children’s human capital with subsequent interactions and investments between these individuals when they are adults, their offspring and their aging parents. This proposal requests supplementary funding for the on-going work summarized above to order to (1) expand the number of G1 subjects to be interviewed; (2) include an additional survey instrument, Ravens Progressive Matrices, to be administered to G3s; and (3) support the participation for six weeks in the data collection process of Erica Soler Hampejsek, a first-year Demography graduate student. These processes, further, will permit expanded networking with our colleagues in Guatemala. The result will be a significantly enriched data set for investigation of interactions among three generations in Guatemala, involvement of Soler-Hampejsek in this research project as part of her graduate research, and extended networking with our Latin American colleagues on this project in Guatemala.

    Funded By: 
    Mellon
    Funded By: 
    P30 Pilots
    Award Dates: 
    July 1, 2005 - June 30, 2006
    PARC Grant Year: 
    Year 12