Past Other Events

February 22, 2017 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Fabio Rojas Associate Professor of Sociology - Indiana University
Location: 169 McNeil
Description: Doing Digital Gender: Three Explorations of Gender and Inequality Using Social Media Data
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February 22, 2017 10:00 AM - 10:45 AM
Adira Fierro P.h.D. Candidate - University of Pennsylvania
Location: 5th Floor McNeil
Description: Parental Involvement in Mexico
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February 16, 2017 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
Robert Hornik Professor Public Health - University of Pennsylvania
Location: Amado Recital Hall
Center for Public Health Initiatives
Description: Public health agencies planning mass media campaigns have to choose message themes: should an anti-tobacco campaign focus on health consequences, or loss of friendship consequences, or cost, or risk of addiction or any of dozens of other themes that they might emphasize?  We have worked with a number of agencies planning such campaigns, making use of survey data and generating estimates of message theme potential.  In this talk, Hornikwill describe the approach and its application to the FDA’s Real Cost campaign, show the results and recommendations and play the ads that resulted from the process.
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February 15, 2017 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
Margarita Konaev Postdoctoral Fellow - Perry World House
Location: Perry World House Conference Room
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February 15, 2017 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Paul Lichterman Professor of Sociology and Religion - University of Southern California
Location: 169 McNeil
Description: How social activists act: fighting for affordable housing in Los Angeles
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February 15, 2017 10:00 AM - 10:45 AM
Hannes Schwandt Assistant Professor of Economics of Child and Youth Development - University of Zurich
Location: 110 McNeil
Description: "The Lasting Legacy of Seasonal Influenza: In-utero Exposure and Human Capital Development"
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February 14, 2017 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
Jesus Ramierz-Valles Professor and Director of Community Health Sciences - University of Illinois-Chicago
Location: 118 Claire M. Fagin Hall
Penn Nursing Science, Penn Social Policy & Practice, NewCourtland Center for Transitions and Health, CFAR, Program for LGBT Health
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February 10, 2017 12:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Penn Law Immigrantion Information & Referral Clinic for the University of Pennsylvania Community
Location: Perry World House, 3803 Locust Walk
Description: Penn Law attorneys and law students will meet with members of the University of Pennsylvania community to answer their questions regarding immigration and travel issues. Attorneys and law students will provide information and advice, and offer referrals for more intensive attorney representation when appropriate. The University of Pennsylvania International Student and Scholar Services (ISSS) representatives will also be on hand to answer questions. Register here.
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February 10, 2017 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
Calvin Zimmerman P.h.D. Student - University of Pennsylvania
Location: 169 McNeil
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February 10, 2017 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Anjali Thomas Bohlken Assistant Professor, Sam Nunn School of International Affairs - Georgia Institute of Technology
Location: 3600 Market Street, Suite 560 (5th floor)
CENTER FOR THE ADVANCED STUDY OF INDIA
Description: About the Lecture:
How do incumbents with influence over infrastructure programs balance their incentives to gain electoral support with their proclivities for rent-seeking? Anjali Thomas Bohlken argues that government elites in parliamentary systems manage this trade-off by concentrating rent-seeking opportunities in their own hands while facilitating efficient public goods provision in the constituencies of their more junior partisan colleagues. Analyses using fine-grained data on road construction in India based on a variety of causal inference strategies support the argument. While ruling party incumbents showed higher levels of road provision in their constituencies regardless of ministerial status, road projects in ministers' constituencies showed higher levels of rent-seeking than those in the constituencies of other ruling party legislators. Moreover, consistent with the mechanism, ruling party legislators' diminished access to rent-seeking opportunities is shown to be largely driven by the influence of co-partisan ministers. The findings illuminate how politicized distribution can sometimes mitigate inefficiencies in infrastructure provision.
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February 9, 2017 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Jonathan Daw Assistant Professor of Sociology and Demography - Penn State University
Location: John Morgan Class of “62”
Description: Living donor kidney transplants (LDKTs) are the primary reason for racial/ethnic disparities in kidney transplantation in recent years – between 2000 and 2010, whites obtained LDKTs at rates more than double that of African Americans. Why is this the case? One possibility, which I call the “differential access” hypothesis, argues that this is an instance of health disparities begetting health disparities – since kin are the most common types of donors and are frequently of the same race, African Americans’ potential donor pool is sicker than whites’, leading to lower levels of access to medically suitable living donors. However, research testing this hypothesis has only examined the donor evaluation outcomes of potential donors, not the characteristics of members of the transplant candidate’s social network that could be evaluated, but are not. Closing this data gap is critical to understanding the role of candidates’ networks in disparities in LDKT. Furthermore, in the last decade, the number of LDKTs has steadily decreased even as the waiting list has grown past 100,000 candidates and the number of deceased donor kidney transplants has increased at a rate insufficient to keep up with demand. In the medium term, LDKTs are arguably the most promising avenue by which to combat this trend – but only if more patients have access to medically suitable and potentially willing living donors than are currently obtaining LDKTs. Therefore, measuring transplant candidates’ social network characteristics to assess prospective donor suitability is a critical step to measuring the degree of underutilization of LDKT for all racial groups, and for designing effective and ethical interventions to promote higher rates of LDKT. I report on the results of a pilot study of 72 transplant candidates and their relationships with 1,611 members of their social networks. These data do not support the differential access hypothesis – if anything, African American transplant candidates appear to have access to more suitable donors than whites. Instead, white candidates appear to be advantaged by a higher rate of prospective donors approaching them to be evaluated without being asked. As candidates rarely decline such offers in these data, promoting potential donor volunteerism and eliminating barriers to doing so seems to be a promising point of intervention. We also find that 86% of candidates have access to at least one promising prospective donor in their networks, suggesting that the extent of underutilization is large. This appears to be especially pronounced among more distant relatives such as nieces/nephews, cousins, and aunts/uncles.
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February 8, 2017 10:00 AM - 10:45 AM
Hyunjoon Park Associate Professor of Sociology and Education - University of Pennsylvania
Location: 5th Floor McNeil
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February 7, 2017 6:00 PM - 7:00 PM
Bethany Wiggin Associate Professor of German and Founding Director of the Penn Program in Environmental Humanities - University of Pennsylvania
Penn Lightbulb Cafe | Location: World Cafe Live 3025 Walnut Street
Description: Since 2005, the Penn Science Café has shined a spotlight on Penn research in the sciences. The Penn Lightbulb Café debuted in 2011 to illuminate research in social science, arts and humanities. The lectures, held on Tuesday evenings at World Cafe Live Upstairs, are free and open to the public. Each talk begins at 6 p.m. and is followed by an audience Q&A session. Café goers can come early for 5-6 p.m. happy hour specials. RSVP not required. Seating is limited. The two lecture series are presented by the School of Arts & Sciences in partnership with the Office of University Communications. Dinner reservations are managed separately through World Cafe Live. 
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February 3, 2017 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
2016-2017 Penn Sociology Teaching Workshop Series: Daniel Aldana Cohen
Daniel Aldana Cohen Assistant Professor of Sociology - University of Pennsylvania
Location: 169 McNeil
Description: Join us for the fourth in a series of teaching workshops tailored to graduate students in Sociology and related fields. Penn sociologist (and recent hire) Daniel Aldana Cohen will lead a workshop on how to prepare for your first course as a professor. These interactive workshops—led in partnership with the Center for Teaching and Learning—are designed to prepare graduate students for college-level teaching and mentorship. Open to all Penn graduate students. No RSVP required. For questions, email CTL Graduate Fellow Shantee Rosado at srosado@sas.upenn.edu. Attendance counts towards the CTL Teaching Certificate.
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February 2, 2017 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
Jooyoung Lee Assistant Professor of Sociology - University of Toronto
Location: Fagin Hall room 118
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February 1, 2017 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Isaac Martin Professor of Sociology - University of California, San Diego
Location: 169 McNeil
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January 31, 2017 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM
The World Today | Location: Perry World House, 3803 Locust Walk
Perry World House
Description: Each Tuesday, this hour is dedicated to a conversation about global issues. All Penn students are welcome. The World Today will be led by a different individual each week, including PWH directors, Penn faculty, postdocs, and visitors. Some weeks, it might be a general discussion of current events, and other weeks, it might have a specific focus on one pressing global issue. This hour will offer a consistent time during which members of the Penn community know they can come to PWH for an engaging conversation about global matters. Perry World House is looking to connect globally-interested graduate students from across the University. Individuals from all fields of study who are interested in global research or international affairs are welcome. 
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January 27, 2017 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
Janice McCabe Associate Professor - Dartmouth College
Location: 169 McNeil
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January 27, 2017 9:00 AM - 3:45 PM
Ezekiel Emanuel Vice Provost for Global Initiatives - University of Pennsylvania
Location: Perry World House, 3803 Locust Walk
Description: Penn Global and Penn China Initiatives will host an interdisciplinary symposium to highlight and facilitate discussion on activities supported by the Penn China Research and Engagement Fund (CREF) and other China-related work at Penn. The symposium, which will run from 9 am to 3:45 pm, will feature research “blitz” presentations, highlighting Penn faculty work across a broad range of fields, and programmatic workshops on conducting research and activities in China. Please see below for the agenda. Join us for this event that will foster interdisciplinary dialogue and inform Penn’s ongoing engagement in China. If you have already registered, there is no need to re-register. This program is open to the entire University of Pennsylvania community. Please note that any audio or video recording is strictly prohibited. Please RSVP for the Symposium at: https://goo.gl/forms/bS77A1TGRBcwWJIY2
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January 26, 2017 3:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Adrienne Brown Assistant Professor, English - University of Chicago
Location: Hagerty Library, L-33, Drexel Main Campus
Institute for New Economic Thinking, Drexel University College of Arts and Sciences
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