Calls for Papers

  • June 1, 2016

    Because it is clear that sex differences in health depend on social, behavioral and environmental context as well as biology, and because societies, behaviors, and environment are changing rapidly around the world, we invite the submission of papers that further our understanding of how and why women and men differ in health outcomes.   

    The desire to focus a journal issue on the Health of Women and Men is timely for a number of reasons.  Recent trends in the health status of American women indicate recent trends are worse than those of peers in other countries, and worse than those for men in the United States. For example, since 1980, U.S. women have lost 1-6 years of life expectancy relative to women in comparably wealthy nations, and 2-3 years of life expectancy relative to American males.  In addition, we have rapidly increasing data resources to study health differentials between women and men and their causes, including change over time and with age.  Comparative analyses of sex differences in international settings as well as studies from individual countries using relatively newly available rich data may lead to better understanding of the biological versus social or environmental factors causing men and women to differ in health. Changes in female/male differentials with age, time or cohort could also lead to increased insight.  

    Our expectation is that papers will be based on empirical analysis.  Papers should also help clarify our understanding of differences between women and men which generally requires a comparative analysis. Papers from multiple disciplines and methodological approaches are welcome.   

    Submit papers for the Special Issue on the Health of Men and Women by June 1, 2016.

    Eileen Crimmins Editor, Biodemography and Social Biology

    Date posted: 11/16/2015 | View listing