Childhood Conditions that Predict Survival to Advanced Ages Among African Americans

Working paper number: 
97-03
Paper Abstract: 
This paper investigates the social and economic circumstances of childhood that predict the probability of survival to age 85. It uses a unique study design in which survivors are linked to their records in U.S. Censuses of 1900 and 1910. A control group of age and race-matched children is drawn from Public Use Samples for these censuses. It concludes that the factors most predictive of survival are farm background, having literate parents, and living in a two-parent household. Results support the interpretation that death risks are positively correlated over the life cycle.
Other Published Version(s): 

Preston, S.H., M.E. Hill, and G.L. Drevenstedt. 1998. "Childhood Conditions that Predict Survival to Advanced Ages Among African-Americans." Social Science & Medicine 47(9):1231-1246.